Safety Manual

Revised 2014

Workplace Violence

Any preventive measure must be based on a thorough understanding of the risk factors associated with the various types of workplace violence. Even though our understanding of the factors which lead to workplace violence is not perfect, sufficient information is available which, if utilized effectively, can reduce the risk of workplace violence. However, strong management commitment, and the day-to-day involvement of managers, supervisors, and employees is required to reduce the risk of workplace violence.

Injury and Illness Prevention Program for Workplace Security

Cal Poly Corporation’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) for Workplace Security addresses the hazards known to be associated with the three major types of workplace violence. Type I workplace violence involves a violent act by an assailant with no legitimate relationship to the workplace who enters the workplace to commit a robbery or other criminal act. Type II involves a violent act by a recipient of a service provided by the Corporation, such as a client, patient, customer, passenger or a criminal suspect or prisoner. Type III involves a violent act by a current/former employee, supervisor or manager, or another person who has some employment related involvement with the Corporation, such as an employee’s spouse or partner, an employee’s relative or friend, or another person who has a dispute with one of our employees.

Responsibility

The IIPP administrator for workplace security is Human Resouces, which has the authority and responsibility to implement the provisions of this program for the Cal Poly Corporation.

All managers and supervisors are responsible for implementing and maintaining this IIPP in their work areas and for answering employee questions about the IIPP. A copy of this IIPP is available from each manager and supervisor.

All employees are responsible for abiding by the regulations regarding workplace violence. Acts or threats of violence are prohibited.

Compliance

Corporation management is committed to ensuring that all safety and health policies and procedures involving workplace security are clearly communicated and understood by all employees.

All employees are responsible for using safe work practices, for following all directives, policies and procedures, and for assisting in maintaining a safe and secure work environment.

Our system of ensuring that all employees, including supervisors and managers, comply with work practices that are designed to make the workplace more secure, and do not engage in verbal threats or physical actions which create a security hazard for others in the workplace, include:

  1. Informing employees, supervisors and managers of the provisions of our IIPP for Workplace Security;
  2. Evaluating the performance of all employees in complying with our establishment’s workplace security measures;
  3. Recognizing employees who perform work practices which promote security in the workplace;
  4. Providing training and/or counseling to employees whose performance in complying with work practices designed to ensure workplace security is deficient;
  5. Disciplining workers for failure to comply with workplace security practices.

Communication

We recognize that to maintain a safe, healthy and secure workplace we must have open, two-way communication between all employees, including managers and supervisors, on all workplace safety, health and security issues. The Corporation’s communication system is designed to encourage a continuous flow of safety, health and security information between management and our employees without fear of reprisal in a form that is readily understandable. Our system consists of the following items:

  1. New employee orientation on our establishment’s workplace security policies, procedures and work practices;
  2. Training programs designed to address specific aspects of workplace security;
  3. Regularly scheduled safety meetings to discuss workplace security;
  4. Posted or distributed workplace security information;
  5. A system for workers to inform management about workplace security hazards and verbal or physical threats of violence that includes protecting employees from retaliation by the person making the threats;
  6. A system for immediately and safely communicating a warning to law enforcement authorities, management, and other employees about an imminent act of violence or threat of imminent violence;
  7. A safety and health committee that: meets regularly; prepares written records of the safety and health committee meetings; reviews results of the periodic scheduled workplace security inspections; reviews investigations of workplace violence and makes suggestions to management for the prevention of future incidents; reviews threats and incidents; and submits recommendations to assist in the evaluation; training and counseling of employees.

Hazard Assessment

Periodic inspections to identify and evaluate workplace security hazards and threats of workplace violence are performed by the Health and Safety Committee.

Periodic inspections are performed on a quarterly basis, when new, previously unidentified security hazards are recognized, when occupational injuries or threats of injury occur, or whenever workplace security conditions warrant an inspection. Periodic inspections for security hazards consist of identification and evaluation of workplace security hazards and changes in employee work practices, and may require assessing for more than one type of workplace violence. The Corporation performs inspections for each type of workplace violence by using the methods specified below to identify and evaluate workplace security hazards.

Inspections for type I workplace security hazards may include assessing:

  1. The exterior and interior of the workplace for its attractiveness to robbers;
  2. The need for security surveillance measures, such as mirrors or cameras;
  3. Posting of signs notifying the public that limited cash is kept on the premises;
  4. Procedures for employee response during a robbery or other criminal act;
  5. Procedures for reporting suspicious persons or activities;
  6. Posting of emergency telephone numbers for law enforcement, fire and medical services where employees have access to a telephone with an outside line;
  7. Limiting of the amount of cash on hand and using time access safes for large bills.

Inspections for Type II workplace security hazards may include assessing:

  1. Access to, and freedom of movement within, the workplace;
  2. Adequacy of workplace security systems, such as door locks, security windows, physical barriers and restraint systems;
  3. Frequency and severity of threatening or hostile situations that may lead to violent acts by persons who are service recipients of our establishment;
  4. Employees’ skill in safely handling threatening or hostile service recipients;
  5. Effectiveness of systems to warn others of a security danger or to summon assistance, (e.g., alarms or panic buttons);
  6. The use of work practices such as “buddy” systems for specified emergency events;
  7. The availability of employee escape routes.

Inspections for Type III workplace security hazards may include assessing:

  1. How effectively the Corporation’s anti-violence policy has been made known to employees, supervisors, or managers;
  2. Awareness by employees, supervisors and managers of the warning signs of potential workplace violence;
  3. Access to, and freedom of movement within, the workplace by non-employees, including recently discharged employees or persons with whom one of our employee’s is having a dispute;
  4. Frequency and severity of employee reports of threats of physical or verbal abuse by managers, supervisors or other employees.

Incident Investigations

Procedures for investigating incidents of workplace violence include:

  1. Reviewing all previous incidents involving violence at our workplace, including threats of violence and verbal abuse;
  2. Visiting the scene of an incident as soon as possible;
  3. Interviewing injured or threatened employees and witnesses;
  4. Examining the workplace for security risk factors associated with the incident, including any reports of inappropriate behavior by the perpetrator;
  5. Determining the cause of the incident;
  6. Taking corrective action to prevent the incident from recurring;
  7. Recording the findings and corrective actions taken.

Hazard Correction

Hazards which threaten the security of employees shall be corrected in a timely manner when they are first observed or discovered. Immediate corrective action includes:

  1. Notification of law enforcement authorities when a criminal act has occurred;
  2. Emergency medical care provided in the event of any violent act upon an employee;
  3. Post-event trauma counseling for those employees desiring such assistance.

Corrective measures for Type I workplace security hazards can include:

  1. Making the workplace unattractive to robbers;
  2. Utilizing surveillance measures, such as cameras or mirrors, to provide information as to what is going on outside and inside the workplace;
  3. Procedures for the reporting suspicious persons or activities;
  4. Posting of emergency telephone numbers for law enforcement, fire and medical services where employees have access to a telephone with an outside line;
  5. Posting of signs notifying the public that limited cash is kept on the premises;
  6. Limiting the amount of cash on hand and using time access safes for large bills;
  7. Employee, training on emergency action procedures.

Corrective measures for Type II workplace security hazards can include:

  1. Controlling access to, and freedom of movement within the workplace consistent with business necessity;
  2. Ensuring the adequacy of workplace security systems, such as door locks, security widows, physical barriers and restraint systems;
  3. Providing employee training in recognizing and handling threatening or hostile situations that may lead to violent acts by persons who are service recipients of our establishment;
  4. Placing effective systems to warn others of a security danger or to summon assistance, e.g. alarms or panic buttons;
  5. Providing procedures for a “buddy” system for specified emergency events;
  6. Ensuring adequate employee escape routes;

Corrective measures for Type III workplace security hazards can include:

  1. Effectively communicating the Corporation’s anti-violence policy to all employees;
  2. Identifying employees’ perceptions about how management treats its employees;
  3. Increasing awareness by employees, supervisors and managers of the warning signs of potential workplace violence;
  4. Controlling access to, and freedom of movement within, the workplace by non-employees, including recently discharged employees or persons with whom one of our employee’s is having a dispute;
  5. Providing counseling to employees, supervisors or managers who exhibit behavior that represents strain or pressure which may lead to physical or verbal abuse of co-employees;
  6. Ensure that all reports of violent acts, threats of physical violence, verbal abuse, property damage or other signs of strain or pressure in the workplace are handled effectively by management and that the person making the report is not subject to retaliation by the person making the threat;
  7. Ensure that employee disciplinary and discharge procedures address the potential for workplace violence.

Training and Instruction

All employees, shall have training and instruction on general and job-specific workplace security practices. Training and instruction shall be provided as follows:

  1. When the IIPP for Workplace security is first established;
  2. To all new employees and all other employees for which training has not previously been provided;
  3. To all supervisors and managers;
  4. To all employees, supervisor and managers given new job assignments for which specific workplace security training for that job assignment has not previously been provided;
  5. Whenever the employer is made aware of a new or previously unrecognized security hazards.

Workplace security training and instruction includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  1. Explanation of the IIPP for Workplace security, including measures for reporting any violent acts, threats of violence or verbal abuse;
  2. Recognition of workplace security hazards including the risk factors associated with the three types of workplace violence;
  3. Measures to prevent workplace violence, including procedures for reporting workplace security hazards to threats to managers and supervisors;
  4. Ways to diffuse hostile or threatening situations;
  5. Measures to summon others for assistance;
  6. Employee routes of escape;
  7. Emergency action and post-emergency procedures.

In addition, we provide specific instructions to all employees regarding workplace security hazards unique to their job assignments, to the extent that such information was not already covered in other training.

Type I training and instruction for employees may include:

  • Crime awareness.
  • Location and operation of alarm systems.
  • Communication procedures.
  • Proper work practices for specific workplace activities or assignments, such as late night retail sales.

Type II training and instruction for employees may include:

  • Self-protection.
  • Dealing with angry, hostile and threatening individuals.
  • Care, use and maintenance of alarm tools and other protective devices.
  • Location and operation of alarm systems.
  • Determination of when to use the “buddy” system or other assistance from co-workers.
  • Awareness of indicators that lead to violent acts by recipients of service providers.

Type III training and instruction for employees include:

  • Pre-employment screening practices.
  • Employee Assistance Programs.
  • Awareness of indicators that lead to violent acts.
  • Managing with respect and consideration for employee well-being.
  • Review of anti-violence policy and procedures.